Well hi there. You might be checking by to see what new piece of writing I have ready for you today, but I unfortunately have some bad news for you. I’m drawing a complete blank. Nothing really at all going on up there today. I guess I simply have nothing inspiring me to write.

A lot of my writing seems to be inspired either by moments of clarity, or by moments of darkness, but at this moment life just is. I’m going with the flow…I’m simply living to live. It makes me question what one should devote their time to. The Buddhists search to conquer the present moment by ridding themselves of any thoughts and feelings that would distract them from what’s happening all around them minute to minute. While on the other hand, the philosopher searches for the intangible; the origin of thought, time, and matter; a clear division from their Buddhists counterparts. So which way is the better way to live? In reality I see an extreme amount of value in both mindsets.

Over the last few weeks I’ve lived more within the present, living one day at a time and enjoying life. It’s been very satisfying to stop worrying about the future or the past, and just be. On the other hand, there are periods in my life when I become extremely critically minded, when I question and evaluate the nature of reality itself. That lifestyle can also be extremely satisfying in a dissatisfying way…you know? You may end up with a million more questions after many hours of thinking, but in the process you do seem to discover yourself. As an individual you evolve into a deeper thinker, which helps you navigate all of life’s winding paths. Yet, when you take the Buddhist standpoint, transcendence is that moment when you overcome your ego and become one with all. No longer does purpose, individuality, or accomplishments add value to life. It is a way to embrace nothingness, and having experienced moments of serenity myself, I can see why a person would choose to meditate for days on end.

So now I’m left with the question of whether or not it’s a good choice to follow both trains of thought. One seems to build an extreme internal peace, while the other shakes that peace at it’s foundations. Unfortunately there doesn’t seem to be a lot of grey area between the two.

Kevan